Warning: Declaration of aec_contributor_list::form() should be compatible with WP_Widget::form($instance) in /var/sites/e/eliehistory.com/public_html/wp-content/plugins/ajax-event-calendar/inc/widget-contributors.php on line 0
Lock-down Quiz No 3 - Elie & Earlsferry History Society
Coat of Arms of the Royal Burgh of Earlsferry and Elie

Elie & Earlsferry History Society

Registered Charity No SC035015

find us on Facebook

Lock-down Quiz No 3

Here is another local history quiz to help keep you amused during lock-down. This one is a little different. Answers will be published next week.

The Journey

I have decided to go on a journey in the East Neuk by bike.  I cheated a little in that I loaded the bike on to the back of the car and drove to my starting point.

I started in a small village which not many people pass through as it’s not really on the route between any other places.  It was where the Terras Family first had a shop and actually there is still a sign of it in the village.  Anyway, I got on my bike and cycled along the main street in a generally westerly direction until I came to a milestone, which had recently been refurbished.  I turned left here as it is really the main road.  I cycled along this road passing a rough track on my right which led to a  quarry on the hill and a dog kennel place.  Anyway, I came to a T Junction.  Taking care, I turned left here and freewheeled for a bit down a hill but remember as a small boy freewheeling by car all the way from Kilbrackmont past the wee manny. I had to start peddling again when I passed an entrance to  what used to be a large stately home but now is a modern house and there was a ruined stable courtyard that we used to play in as wee boys.  It was downhill again and freewheeled until I stopped at a T junction.  I noticed a cottage on my right hand side.  The owner was made famous by a song.  

Anyway, couldn’t dally so I turned left and here was a straight stretch of road that I was able to get up a fair speed until a sharp bend to the right and I noticed a sign to a Castle (well I have never thought it was really a castle, but it called itself that).  I turned this corner  and passed the entrance to a stately home but it was private so I carried on up a hill and then I took a road to the right.  This was signed and reminded me of an American clothing company or at least part of it.  I cycled hard along the rest of this road until I arrived at a T junction.  On my left was a boat with a humorous sign on it.  I turned right here because if I had carried straight on I would have been at the site of an old station. But I could not go straight on today so I turned right.   I passed a small industrial estate and then an old Victorian House standing on its own looking a bit forlorn.  I continued along this road over a small bridge and passed on my right a farm which has been commercialised into an events venue.  But as I looked left  also saw the ruins of some sort of castle.  

By now I was getting a bit tired but I reckoned that had I been on this road in 1857 I would have been able to stop shortly for a refreshment at an old public house.  When I got there, it was not present any longer so I turned right.  This was not such a good road but I made progress up a hill round a few bends and past a farm which reminded me of the Union of  South Africa.  But I dallied not, as the windy road led me eventually into another village whose name has colloquially been corrupted and bears no resemblance to the written word.  I turned left here and ambled though the village, spotting a most unusual sign warning of a hazard ahead.  I did not have to stop and I could not see any.  At last it looked as if I could  get a refreshment here opposite and very imposing church.  I needed the break….. After suitable libation I remounted and cycled up a small hill and instead of taking the main road which was a sharp left turn I went straight on to another crossroads.  I remembered that on my left hand side in the wood was a factory of which there was no sign now.  I went straight across this junction and remembered that a long time ago I might had had to wait at some gates here.  But not today.  On I went along a single track road until I came to a car park after having passed an old mill.  I decided to pedal straight on up the hill on a rough track.  Bone shaking it was too, until I reached the top of a hill when a whole village vista was set out before me and there was ruined house on my left.  I bumbled down this hill and carried straight on.    Had this been a Sunday and before 1950, I would have not had to look out for my own safety but today was different.  When I got to the end of the track I found a proper road and had this been 30 years ago I would have been able to turn right but not today, so I dismounted and pushed my bike to the right passing a house on the corner which suggested it faced in many directions.  I came to a crossroads which I remember that some skeletons were found along time ago but not today – it was very busy with lots of walkers so I got on my bike again and turned right.  

I came to a track leading off to the right so decided to take this.  It did not really have an official name but its name locally seemed to me  to be a bit like what happened to my fishing lines.  I cycled along this track towards the sea and I remember that this was where there was a man who had some salmon fishing nets.  And I noticed a rock just at low water mark a sort of pimple and it occurred to me that that the name of this rock with the addition of a few letters was very similar to where I started my cycle.  I remembered that if you drew a line from this rock to a large stone just on my left all the ground to the south of this was the old Earlsferry Commonty and a triangle to the right between that line and where a plough was used in 1813 there was a piece of ground which suggested locally the discovery of fuel.  I decided rather than going onto the beach I would turn left along a track round a long wall  on both sides.  The seaward side of the wall did not seem to enclose anything.  I followed the wall round and came across the ruin of a small religious establishment apparently after which the spot was named.  I sat on a seat here and looked out across the village and phoned my chauffeuse to come and pick me up.  I was fairly tired now.

OK, can you help me reconstruct my journey and answer the following questions:

  1. Where did I start?
  2. What was the name of the dog kennel place?
  3. Where’s the wee manny?
  4. What’s the name of the modern house on the footprint of the old stately home?
  5. Who is credited with being the architect who designed it?
  6. who was made famous by a song and had the cottage on the corner?
  7. Who wrote the song?
  8. What is the name of the castle?
  9. What is the name of the stately home I passed?
  10. What was the American clothing company’s name?
  11. What is the humorous sign on the boat?
  12. What was the name of the old station – accurately please?
  13. What used to be the function of the old Victorian House?
  14. What is the name of the events venue I passed?
  15. What ruin did I see from there?
  16. What is the name of the old public house I could have got a drink at in 1857?
  17. Why did the farm remind me of the Union of South Africa?
  18. What is the name of the village that colloquially has been corrupted?
  19. What was the unusual sign of hazard ahead?
  20. When was the church opposite the Inn built?
  21. What is there on the sign for the inn which relates to a sport?
  22. What was the name of the factory?
  23. Why might I have had to wait at some gates?
  24. What is the name of the old mill which I passed?
  25. What was name of the ruined house on the left at the top of the hill?
  26. Why would I not have had to lookout if I had been cycling in 1950?
  27. What’s the name of the house on the corner suggesting multi-exposure?
  28. Whose are reckoned to have been the skeletons  discovered at the crossroads?
  29. What is the name of the track I took?
  30. Who had the fishing nets in 1950s?
  31. What is the name of the rock?
  32. What is the name of the piece of ground suggesting fuel?
  33. What is the name of the piece of ground to the seaward side of the track?
  34. Where did my journey end?

Quiz compiled by Graham Johnston, Chairman, Elie & Earlsferry History Society Registered Charity No SC035015

Get to know your local history.

Comments

  1. Mandy Clunie

    11 April 2020 at 10:41

    Really enjoyed this and got most of the questions I think, a wee journey while staying at home x

  2. Albert.

    11 April 2020 at 21:15

    I enjoyed this …. it’s been one of my training runs on the bike for years. I think I did really well on this…. the only one I wasn’t sure of was the dog kennels … Baldutho?

  3. Society Member Post author

    26 April 2020 at 12:01

    Here are the answers to The Journey…..

    1. Where did I start? I started at Arncroach, which was where the Terras family had a post office and grocery shop before opening a shoe shop in Elie. Bit of a problem if you started elsewhere!!

    2. What was the name of the dog kennel place? It’s called Paw Prints.

    3. Where’s the wee manny? This is the stone statuette on the top of the lodge house to Balcarres it is known as the De’ils Lodge. Not sure of the history but I was once told that it was put there by the builder of the lodge house when the Earl of Crawford disputed his bill.

    4. What’s the name of the modern house on the footprint of the old stately home? This is Pitcorthie and it was built in 1960 – see below, but it is on the footprint of a very much grander house going back to 18th C probably owned by the Lindsay Family. It was a large imposing structure and obviously surplus to the needs of the Lindsays, so it was sort of gifted to the Church of Scotland in about 1920 as a holiday home for Guild members and it remained as such until 1941, when it was in some disrepair. Indeed, there had been a fire at one point. There was an attempt to retain it but eventually permission was granted for its demolition and the current modern building was put in its place.

    5. Who is credited with being the architect who designed it? It was a chap called Trevor Dannat, but you would not know that unless you Googled it, which I did!

    6. Who was made famous by a song and had the cottage on the corner? This was Robin Gray. “Auld Robin Gray” is the title of a Scots ballad written by a Scottish poet in 1772. Robin Gray is a good old man who marries a young woman already in love with a man named Jamie. Jamie goes away to sea in order to earn money so that the couple can marry. The woman, who narrates the ballad, tells the story of being compelled by her parents’ misfortune to marry Robin Gray while her lover is away. Robin promises to maintain her and her parents in return for her hand. Jamie returns a few weeks after the marriage, looking like a ghost. They have a sad reunion, kiss and tear themselves away from each other. The woman resolves to do her best to be a good wife to Robin, though she is extremely sad at the loss of her true love.

    7. Who wrote the song? Lady Anne Lindsay.

    8. What is the name of the castle? Kellie Castle.

    9. What is the name of the stately home I passed? Balcaskie.

    10. What was the American clothing company’s name? Abercrombie and Fitch.

    11. What is the humorous sign on the boat? “Short John Silver”

    12. What was the name of the old station – accurately please? The railway company named it St. Monance (now known as St. Monans and previously St. Minnins).

    13. What used to be the function of the old Victorian House? The Manse for St. Monans (recently sold).

    14. What is the name of the events venue I passed? Bowhouse, of course.

    15. What ruin did I see from there? Newark.

    16. What is the name of the old public house I could have got a drink at in 1857? Catchpenny, which is the name of the field at the corner of the road up to Balbuthie – Alec Nairn adopted it for his glamping business.

    17. Why did the farm remind me of the Union of South Africa? John Cameron is the owner of the farm and a railway enthusiast who purchased the A4 locomotive ‘Union of South Africa’ from BR when withdrawn.

    18. What is the name of the village that colloquially has been corrupted? Kinneuchar.

    19. What was the unusual sign of hazard ahead? Ducks crossing the road, but it may only be when you are going eastwards!

    20. When was the church opposite the Inn built? That church was consecrated in 1832, but there was a much older establishment run by the Culdees the ruins of which lie alongside the church.

    21. What is there on the sign for the Inn which relates to a sport? Curling stones, because Kilconquhar Loch used to have bonspiels when it froze over and Hercules Curling Club had an artificial rink alongside the field at the corner of the loch.

    22. What was the name of the factory? Broomlees Tile factory.

    23. Why might I have had to wait at some gates? There used to be a level crossing there and they would be closed when the train was expected.

    24. What is the name of the old mill which I passed? Muircambus.

    25. What was name of the ruined house on the left at the top of the hill? Grange House destroyed in 1880 by fire and never rebuilt.

    26. Why would I not have had to lookout if I had been cycling in 1950? Because there was no golf on the golf course on Sundays.

    27. What’s the name of the house on the corner suggesting multi-exposure? Four Winds, built by Lawrie and Val Duff in mid 1960s – it was originally the orchard and garden of Earlsferry House.

    28. Whose are reckoned to have been the skeletons discovered at the crossroads? Thought to be Danish raiders.

    29. What is the name of the track I took? Sea Tangle Road.

    30. Who had the fishing nets in 1950s? Jimmy Linton.

    31. What is the name of the rock? Coach rock – hence Arncroach.

    32. What is the name of the piece of ground suggesting fuel? Coalbakie – it was thought that this was where the local could harvest coals. I think it was a small triangle to the north of a line from the coach rock to a standing stone currently just in the field to the north of Craigforth. It was reckoned that the land to the south of this line was the Earlsferry Commonty and the Coalbakie was a small triangle stretching effectively across the 12th Fairway.

    33. What is the name of the piece of ground to the seaward side of the track? Doom or Dome Park – for its history see the Elie History phone app.

    34. Where did my journey end? Chapel Green.

    HAPPY TO DISCUSS THESE ANSWERS IF SOMEONE HAS BETTER INFORMATION!

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.